Find flow, fight fear, and create focus!

Sleep Better: 6 Sleep Habits To Help You Focus

with 13 comments

“I’ll sleep when I’m dead” – Some Anonymous Idiot

Click for photo We’ve all heard this quote, most likely from an interview in a business magazine with some mega-billionaire CEO.  Of course this person is either a walking collection of crazy or some genetically gifted mutant.  I’m actually not kidding about that mutant option, as those who thrive on little sleep may have a rare genetic mutation according to a recent sleep study at the University of San Francisco.  Of course, that mutation was found in just 2 out of 1000 study participants – so rare is right.

The rest of us need sleep and need it badly.  And we probably need more of it than we think, or at least more than we’re inclined to let ourselves get by on.

In a 2002 study conducted by the National Sleep Foundation (PDF), it was found that the majority of American adults (68%) don’t get the recommended 8 hours of sleep needed for good health and optimum performance, and more than one-third (39%) sleep less than 7 hours nightly.  Strangely (yet ironically) enough, a staggering 85% of those surveyed said they would sleep more if they knew it would improve their health.

Guess what?  It does improve your health.  And your sex life, body shape, and ability to stay awake during Avatar in IMAX 3D.  It’s also the best way to improve your mood and the way you respond when you’re frustrated or stressed out.  In other words, good sleep can keep you from being a jerk AND help you look and feel better.

Lack of sleep can also have a profound effect on memory and other cognitive skills.  In an interesting study, researchers measured cognitive function in sleep-deprived, right-handed men and found that sleep deprivation has a negative effect on cognitive functions associated with "right-brained" functions such as "motor, rhythm, receptive & expressive speech, memory and complex verbal arithmetic function." (PDF link)

There are a number of ways to improve your sleep habits – this post is just going to scratch the surface with six basic habits you should start incorporating into your life if you don’t already.  Over the next few months, I’m sure there will be six more… and then six more and so on.  But hey, you’ve got to start somewhere! 

1. Know how much sleep you need, and make it a priority

This one may take some trial and error, but its impact on your lifestyle will be immeasurable.  Draw a correlation between the number of hours you sleep on a given night and your energy levels the following day. (Make sure to maintain a constant diet as changes in your diet could cause your energy levels to vary considerably.)  Before going to sleep, start a stopwatch or a timer.  (If you fall asleep as your head hits the pillow, it is a sure sign of sleep deprivation!).  As soon as you wake up, stop the timer and record the total time you were asleep in a sleep journal.

Do this for about two weeks, making sure to record your energy level using a 1-10 scale in your journal each day.  When you felt "awake" and full of vigor throughout the day, score it a 10.  If you’re nodding off at your desk and have little or no real energy, give that day a 1. (While the scoring will be subjective, since you are the only one performing the evaluations, it should be relatively reliable.)

At the end of the two-week period, you should be able to determine your "ideal" nightly sleep target, which should fall somewhere between 7 and 10 hours depending on genetics (few can get by with only 6 hours and VERY few can get by with less than 6).  Now, make it a priority to reach your quota by doing whatever you can to put sleep first!

If you’re too lazy to do this (no judgment here! I am too) then start with somewhere between 7 and 8 hours of sleep each night as this is the most common requirement.

2. Limit your naps, if you need them, to 15-30 minutes

It’s natural to feel sluggish or tired every once in a while.  If you feel the urge to nap, do it!  There are a couple of caveats though, and they’re important to remember.  Try not to nap in the late afternoon, as it could delay the time you fall asleep at night and cause your internal sleep clock to go haywire for a few days.

Napping in the late morning or early afternoon, on the other hand, can help you feel more alert throughout the day and give your system a needed "boost" as well as promote faster recuperation from intense exercise.  Keep the amount of time you spend napping to a minimum, usually no more than 30 minutes.  A short nap is all the body needs to revitalize the nervous system and restore alertness.  Any longer, and your body falls into delta (deep) sleep and you may have trouble waking up.  And when you do, you may be irritable or slightly dazed.

See How to Power Nap on WikiHow for more on this.

3. Maintain a consistent sleep schedule

It’s very important to go to bed and wake up (unassisted!) at the same time every day, even on weekends.  This will help regulate your internal sleep clock, making sure you are at your most awake during the day when you need it most.  Interestingly, if you maintain a constant sleep schedule for a few weeks, you may find that your nightly quota will decrease slightly, and you will be more alert on less sleep each night!

4. Pay back your "sleep debt" as soon as possible

Think of your body like a bank.  Every time you fail to meet your sleep quota, your body registers it as debt and expects to be "paid back”.  Your sleep debt will continue to accumulate until you make up for it!  Have you ever noticed that you naturally sleep more the night after a late-night?  That’s your body attempting to make up for lost sleep.

Unfortunately, however, your body can’t store sleep just like it can’t store exercise results.  You can’t sleep 12 hours one night and expect to get by on 4 the next if your quota is 8 hours nightly.  With that said, it becomes even more important to maintain a regular sleep schedule.

5. Avoid alcohol before bed

Many people believe that a glass of wine right before bed will help them sleep better.  The opposite is true. While the alcohol may "knock you out" and make you feel very relaxed initially, it disrupts sleep later on throughout the night.

Alcohol, taken less than 4 hours before bedtime, will severely limit REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, which is essential for daytime alertness.  While you may not even realize it, alcohol could in fact be the indirect cause of lethargy throughout the day.  You may also find yourself waking up more often throughout the night, and that’s an indicator that a deep sleep state isn’t being reached.

6. Practice good sleep hygiene

Maintaining a regular “wind down” routine can help improve your sleep.  Some general tips in this arena include:

  • Read some fiction – or something that helps get your mind off of other things.  Non-fiction can get your mind working too hard, which is not conducive to good sleep.  Read something fun.
  • Shut down computer screens at least 30-60 minutes prior to retiring.  The light emitted from screens can disrupt circadian rhythms and make it harder to fall asleep.  (Snarky note: this is the reason I won’t be buying an iPad for nighttime reading anytime soon)
  • Remove your TV from the bedroom.  Certainly don’t watch prior to falling asleep if you’re having trouble.
  • Kick dogs, cats, and chimps out of your bed.  They’ve been known to disrupt sleep, even if you aren’t aware of it.
  • Break up your nightly routine into multiple parts to make it easier to go to bed.  For example, I take out my contact lenses a few hours before going to bed because I know that when the time comes to get ready, that annoying act of taking out my contacts will give me an excuse not to start the process.  And I’ll stay up later.
  • Keep your bedroom cool – but not cold.  Cooler temperatures are best for sleep.
  • Use a white noise generator (fan, noise machine, etc.) to drown out the sounds of pets, cars, or other hindrances to a good night’s sleep.
  • Straighten up your bedroom each night.  This can help you get out of bed in the morning.

Stop reading this now… and go get some sleep if you need it.  It’s important if you expect to be able to focus at the level you obviously want to (otherwise, what are you doing reading this?)

Thanks to Dr. James Maas of Cornell University for first opening my eyes to the importance of sleep fifteen years ago.

Written by Mike Torres

March 14th, 2010 at 5:03 pm

  • Good stuff. Sleep always seems to be the first thing I axe from my schedule when I get busy and that is obviously not a good idea. Thanks for the reminder.

  • Cara

    Mike, your last two posts are closely related for me. It's not just being on time during the day that I have issues with (Drew will tell ya :), but I have such a hard time going to bed early, because I underestimate the time it will take to get ready for bed. There are so many little things I do, and never start the routine early enough to actually turn off the light before 11:30 or midnight. So this definitely made me think about that–thanks!!

    • No prob! I've definitely started to break the bedtime routine into chunks – the first when I'm not so tired (like 8pm once kid is in bed), and the second when I'm ready to just read. Just to make sure it all gets done and I don't dread doing it at 11pm when I should be going to sleep 😉 That's a total reason to stay up later, because you don't want to deal with getting ready for bed!

  • Cara

    Mike, your last two posts are closely related for me. It's not just being on time during the day that I have issues with (Drew will tell ya :), but I have such a hard time going to bed early, because I underestimate the time it will take to get ready for bed. There are so many little things I do, and never start the routine early enough to actually turn off the light before 11:30 or midnight. So this definitely made me think about that–thanks!!

  • No prob! I've definitely started to break the bedtime routine into chunks – the first when I'm not so tired (like 8pm once kid is in bed), and the second when I'm ready to just read. Just to make sure it all gets done and I don't dread doing it at 11pm when I should be going to sleep 😉 That's a total reason to stay up later, because you don't want to deal with getting ready for bed!

  • These are really helpful tips. I find sleeping on the right mattress helpful. Most of us think that it is our body's duty to adjust to the comfort our mattress provides us. But it should be the other way around. Our mattress should help induce sleep and help us achieve better quality of sleep. So take mattress shopping seriously. If you have a bed partner, test the mattress together. Do your homework and recognize your body's sleep needs before buying.

  • I would like to add that keep your bedroom clean and regularly change your bedding set.

  • BedTimeStory

    Sleep is indeed a decisive factor in our health and let me tell you that I experienced that myself. 4 years ago I used to play Mu Online like crayz, night after night and just 2-3 hours of sleep per day. After 6 months I had to power to quit my gaming addiction and I started my recovery night by night… but I was never the same. I used to go to bed at 9-10 Pm and wake up at 6-7am. Now I wake up at 9-10 am…
    ___________________________________________________________
    tempurpedic mattress discount

  • cydonia16

    Nice tips, I used to drink beer a lot before bed thinking it would help, now I realize it was doing the opposite lol. I have a tempurpedic mattress discount that I'm planning on using soon, apparently those type of beds with foam can make a huge difference for some people.

  • If you are the one who snoring, I have some good pillow information. You can see details at http://www.antisnorepillow.us/

  • Pingback: 7 Ways to Stay Focused (And Keep Doing What You Should Be Doing) | Cicor Marketing | Tampa Chicago()

  • Pingback: 7 Ways to Stay Focused (And Keep Doing What You Should Be Doing) | Social Media Consultant | Social Media Agency | Social Marketing()

  • Pingback: How to Stay Healthy and Lean during the Holidays | ICFSN()

-->